Voluntariado

What would my life in Mexico have been like without the Junior League?

 

When Rosie asked me to write about my years in the Junior League and what the League had meant to me, the first thing that came to my mind was, “What would my life in Mexico for 52 years have been like without the Junior League?” The Junior League gave purpose to my life. In the League, I became committed to a better Mexico.

It all began when in 1971, I received a formal invitation fromThe Junior League of Mexico City inviting me to a tea.   I knew very little about the League but I was excited and anxious to attend.   Since I had married and come to Mexico I had lived in the Colonia San Rafael and I did not have many friends. I had two children at the time, ages one and three.

The tea was a truly elegant affair.  As you say in Spanish “de manteles largos”.  I was fortunate that an older American woman in Mexico City, Myrtle Lubbert, had taken me under her wing.   Little did I know that when she had me over for lunch or coffee with some of her friends, they were members of the Admissions Committee and they were considering issuing me an invitation to join the Junior League. Fortunately, I passed the test!

That day marked the beginning of a way of life for me. The League taught me that women, working together, can make a difference in society. Most of my good friends are women I met and worked within the Junior League.

When Rosie asked me to write about my years in the Junior League and what the League had meant to me, the first thing that came to my mind was, “What would my life in Mexico for 52 years have been like without the Junior League?” The Junior League gave purpose to my life. In the League, I became committed to a better Mexico.

It all began when in 1971, I received a formal invitation fromThe Junior League of Mexico City inviting me to a tea.   I knew very little about the League but I was excited and anxious to attend.   Since I had married and come to Mexico I had lived in the Colonia San Rafael and I did not have many friends. I had two children at the time, ages one and three.

The tea was a truly elegant affair.  As you say in Spanish “de manteles largos”.  I was fortunate that an older American woman in Mexico City, Myrtle Lubbert, had taken me under her wing.   Little did I know that when she had me over for lunch or coffee with some of her friends, they were members of the Admissions Committee and they were considering issuing me an invitation to join the Junior League. Fortunately, I passed the test!

That day marked the beginning of a way of life for me. The League taught me that women, working together, can make a difference in society. Most of my good friends are women I met and worked within the Junior League.